Fantaisie's Fools: an exploration of Commedia dell'Arte

Fantaisie’s Fools: an exploration of Commedia dell’Arte

By Rafael Schneider Commedia dell’arte emerged around the middle of the 16th century as the first professional theater form. The Italian arte here translates as “profession” or “craft,” distinguishing it from more amateur theatre forms such as pageants and festival plays. Commedia plots revolve around the interaction of several stock characters, whom audiences recognized instantly […]

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Real Characters

Real Characters

By Anne Schuster Hunter Baroque artists of all kinds created characters so vibrant that they’re still alive for us today. Just a few literary examples: Shakespeare, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, Gulliver’s Travels, and even Charles Perrault of fairy tales fame (“Cinderella,” “Puss in Boots,” and more). Music was full of characters, too. Tempesta di Mare’s upcoming […]

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Music in Exile (Janitsch Rediscoveries)

Music in Exile (Janitsch Rediscoveries)

By Anne Schuster Hunter “Wonderful things!” Practically dumbstruck, that’s all archaeologist Howard Carter could say at his first sight of the treasures in Tutankhamen’s tomb, glittering in their long-time hiding place. “It felt like that for me, too,” says Richard Stone, Tempesta di Mare Artistic Co-Director, describing his feelings on opening the first box of […]

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Holiday Sweets

Holiday Sweets

By Anne Schuster Hunter The winter holidays—there’s something so golden and lustrous about them. Here at Tempesta di Mare’s offices, in South Philadelphia’s historic Italian Market, the long nights are especially beautiful. Neighbors string lights across the narrow streets and set up window displays that make the old city glow. Italian traditions down here are […]

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Telemann 360° Journal: Telemann's "Lancaster" Cantata Explained

Telemann 360° Journal: Telemann’s “Lancaster” Cantata Explained

By Richard Stone Tonight’s The Faithful Music Master program at the American Philosophical Society in Old City (8:00, 427 Chestnut Street) is devoted to Telemann’s instrumental chamber music, with works that span the period he devoted to the genre, ca. 1700–1740. But mezzo-soprano Meg Bragle will also sing a church cantata with a special connection […]

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Telemann 360° Journal: A Token of Friendship, Perhaps?

Telemann 360° Journal: A Token of Friendship, Perhaps?

By Richard Stone The title for the orchestral program of our Telemann 360° events, Fire and Invention, quotes a letter to Telemann from an admiring contemporary composer, Johann Joachim Quantz (1697–1773), in which Quantz was explaining to Telemann why he was so fond of a certain set of unpublished pieces by Telemann that “…possess a […]

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Telemann 360° Journal: One from column A...

Telemann 360° Journal: One from column A…

By Richard Stone One of the two concertos in our Fire and Invention orchestral program might be my favorite orchestral work by Telemann. And that said, I love both. But the one I’m talking about, a concerto for multiple instruments, became my favorite for its first movement, a concerto along the lines of Bach’s Brandenburg […]

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Telemann 360° Journal: "New" Telemann, Hidden in Plain Sight

Telemann 360° Journal: “New” Telemann, Hidden in Plain Sight

By Richard Stone The set of “Entractes” that we’ll premiere in our Fire and Invention orchestral program—October 14, 8pm, at the Kimmel Center—come thanks to Dr. Steven Zohn’s detective work and his generosity. Six of the pieces in our set are previously-unknown Telemann contained from a compilation by the then-Dresden concertmaster and Telemann’s chum, Johann […]

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G.P. Telemann: Fairy Tales Do Come True

G.P. Telemann: Fairy Tales Do Come True

By Anne Schuster Hunter In Telemann’s time, the city of Dresden was something out of a fairy tale. In the upcoming show Fire and Invention: Telemann’s Showpieces for the Dresden Virtuosi, Tempesta di Mare revisits Dresden’s magic moment with its largest orchestra yet, 31 players—the same size as Dresden in one of its legendary iterations. […]

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G.P. Telemann, Getting the Music Out

G.P. Telemann, Getting the Music Out

By Anne Schuster Hunter Imagine Bach and Handel in their music rooms in Leipzig and London, sitting down, opening the fresh, clean pages of music straight off the press, and playing something new they’d just received from their good friend Georg Philipp Telemann. It’s a goosebumpy image, like in the movies when all the superheroes […]

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